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Username Post: Homeschooling?        (Topic#325548)
Kimberly M 
SJ Diva
Posts: 9042
Kimberly M
Reg: 07-22-08

02-21-13 12:32 PM - Post#4048488    

Can we talk about this without arguing? Derrick and I are considering my homeschooling Aiden and I'd love some insight and thoughts if you guys had them. He is in a special needs pre-school right now and they are great with him but either this year or next we've got the make the decision on him going on to kindergarten. Please don't yell at me or each other LOL

 
kaleidoscope 
SJ Queen of the Crop
Posts: 27368
kaleidoscope
Reg: 02-13-09

02-21-13 12:57 PM - Post#4048492    
    In response to Kimberly M

First, start off with checking the laws in your state so you know what you have to do to be compliant. If he's not at the compulsory age yet, then you don't have to worry about notification or anything until he is.

If he has insurance and can continue to get therapy that way, you won't have to worry about trying to get it through the school either. This might vary by state, but when I pulled my son to homeschool, they wouldn't provide therapy anymore and weren't required to because it wasn't a 'team' decision that he be homeschooled - it was parent initiated. Frankly, I don't know that they were doing such a great lot with him anyway.

And don't worry or give any thought to what people say about socialization. He can get that by going to the park, through homeschool groups, or any other way besides being in a class with other kids.

 
3 Little Ladies 
SJ Deity
Posts: 72782
3 Little Ladies
Reg: 03-10-05

02-21-13 02:00 PM - Post#4048510    
    In response to kaleidoscope

I was going to ask about socialization. Since he is special needs I wonder if socializing with kids in a structured setting (school) would be more beneficial to him? I'm just mentioning it because I know you said that taking him places, like the park, is somewhat stressful because it's not a regular part of his routine.

Have you asked his therapist for their opinion? I would. I would also find out if he would have an aide in public school or not.

 
kaleidoscope 
SJ Queen of the Crop
Posts: 27368
kaleidoscope
Reg: 02-13-09

02-21-13 02:51 PM - Post#4048528    
    In response to 3 Little Ladies

I don't know, it might be beneficial for him to get out of having daily routines so he's not so dependent on them.

But who's to say because every kid is different. I never had a schedule/routine in my house and it really wasn't an issue. Actually, it wasn't til my son was older and had started school that it made more of a difference. There was a period of time where he had to eat between certain hours. If he didn't eat by 10:30 he'd be upset he missed breakfast. Lunch had to be by 3:00 (or whatever it was). That sort of thing. In early elementary, since they did work by schedules, he wasn't too keen on when something changed it.

I wonder if my lack of routine helped him or if he would've been the same way regardless. I can't help but think it's best to not let them get too used to a strict routine and keep it loose. Let them adapt to changes though you'd have to start slowly if it's a really big deal.



 
Kimberly M 
SJ Diva
Posts: 9042
Kimberly M
Reg: 07-22-08

02-21-13 02:56 PM - Post#4048532    
    In response to kaleidoscope

He's doing better without needing a strict routine. Of course some situations are easier than others for him to change but for the most part he's not having epic melt downs if something is switched up.



 
3 Little Ladies 
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Posts: 72782
3 Little Ladies
Reg: 03-10-05

02-21-13 03:06 PM - Post#4048540    
    In response to Kimberly M

Do you think him being in preschool has helped with his meltdowns?

 
Kimberly M 
SJ Diva
Posts: 9042
Kimberly M
Reg: 07-22-08

02-21-13 03:15 PM - Post#4048546    
    In response to 3 Little Ladies

I believe his melt downs were coming from not being understood. So we've been working with his speech therapist for a long time teaching him basic signs in addition to the words he has. He can tell us a little bit of what he needs and wants now so he doesn't feel as frustrated. We also have a better understanding of what triggers his sensory overloads so we can avoid that and it helps him not feel so overwhelmed and terrified. Also he's showing an interest in piano so we bought him a nice keyboard for Christmas and when he gets frustrated or upset he'll go over and do simple melodies I've taught him.
I know some will say that I'm over protective and indulgent but he is so innocent and he needs so much care. The school he is in now is great but it's separate from the regular school system. We drive 30 minutes one way for him to be in his pre-school class. Once he goes to regular school he will be at one near our home and it doesn't have a good program.

 
kaleidoscope 
SJ Queen of the Crop
Posts: 27368
kaleidoscope
Reg: 02-13-09

02-21-13 03:34 PM - Post#4048552    
    In response to Kimberly M

Hoenstly, Kimmy, you come across to me as a person who will do a great job with homeschooling. And you know I'm not a suck up and wouldn't say it if I didn't mean it. I can TOTALLY see you doing this and loving it. (Maybe not every minute but most of the time. )

 
Kimberly M 
SJ Diva
Posts: 9042
Kimberly M
Reg: 07-22-08

02-21-13 03:40 PM - Post#4048556    
    In response to kaleidoscope

Tam, thank you. That means a lot to me. He isn't required to attend Kindergarten or start home schooling until he's 7. I'm thinking that if he can continue in the pre-school class he's in now two days a week next year we will keep doing that and I'll spend the year doing a home school program with him also. It will give me a good indication if it's going to be a good thing for him. We basically do that anyway, just not with formal lesson plans. His teachers let us know what they are working on and we do activities every day to supplement the learning.

 
3 Little Ladies 
SJ Deity
Posts: 72782
3 Little Ladies
Reg: 03-10-05

02-21-13 04:00 PM - Post#4048560    
    In response to Kimberly M

That sounds like a great idea.

 
michann 
Scrapjazz Contributor
Posts: 25018
michann
Reg: 01-09-06

02-21-13 07:19 PM - Post#4048598    
    In response to 3 Little Ladies

I really think it's up to you. You do seem like someone who will follow through on things. There are some great homeschooling co-ops that you can do things with. If you aren't comfortable with your local school, and decide you don't want to home school, you *should* be able to get a variance for a school better suited for him.

It is a tough decision and I don't know what I would do in your shoes. I've been on the other side, as a teacher of a few children on the autistic spectrum and it is harder for them to get the attention they need with larger class sizes, etc.

I've only had 2 students who were home schooled and both parents brought their kids to a local school because they were overwhelmed, but I don't see their parents with the same personality as you. Just make sure he can get the services he needs that he would get in a public school, if you do decide to homeschool (speech, social skills class w/school psych, etc).

 
GwynnAsbury 
SJ Eloquent One
Posts: 3880
GwynnAsbury
Reg: 01-05-06

02-21-13 09:38 PM - Post#4048618    
    In response to michann

I know I don't chim in often, but I thought I would here. Kim, I think the ultimate decision is left up to you, but if you decide to homeschool then you may want to find a way to ensure he gets interaction with other children, so help him to continue to develop his social skills with peers. Some schools will allow a balance between home and in-school teaching, so he is in the class room so many days and at home the others. That may be an option? You could also start researching things that do and don't work with children with your child's disability and at what ages. For example, you may want to see what struggles children have 10 years from now if home schooled and vice versa. Does that make sense?

 
Kimberly M 
SJ Diva
Posts: 9042
Kimberly M
Reg: 07-22-08

02-21-13 09:44 PM - Post#4048620    
    In response to GwynnAsbury

Yes, it does for sure. Right now he loves other kids. He watches them running and playing at the park and at school. He will giggle and flap when the other kids run fast or are very excited but he doesn't understand how to play "with" them

 
GwynnAsbury 
SJ Eloquent One
Posts: 3880
GwynnAsbury
Reg: 01-05-06

02-21-13 10:38 PM - Post#4048622    
    In response to Kimberly M

Sounds like he is ready to interact with other children. Have you asked his speech therapist or psychologist the best way to introduce him and have it be a positive experience? Kids that young generally are very accepting of other kids..

 
Judge Amy 
SJ Diva
Posts: 5729
Judge Amy
Reg: 01-27-05

02-23-13 09:16 AM - Post#4048874    
    In response to GwynnAsbury

You know your child better than anyone and can make the decision that you feel will serve him best.
Since he isn't required to be in school yet, I would recommend that you go ahead and homeschool on a trial basis. 1 - to see how he does with it, and 2 - to see how you do with it.
Definitely research the requirements for your state, and check into HSLDA if you decide to do it as they are great at protecting hs families when needed and with lots of resources.
Good luck

 
Nora 
Blue Crew Member
Posts: 53731
Nora
Reg: 01-22-03

02-23-13 11:31 AM - Post#4048910    
    In response to Judge Amy

I think HS is a personal decision and for special needs, it is even more of a decision. Is he getting various therapies now-OT, PT and Speech? If so, are they doing things that you are following up on at home anyway?

In our town we have a grammar school that specifically has a program for autistic kids. From what I really here, it is fabulous. Do other states have this?

 
Kimberly M 
SJ Diva
Posts: 9042
Kimberly M
Reg: 07-22-08

02-23-13 11:53 AM - Post#4048926    
    In response to Nora

All of Aiden's therapies are through our private insurance and that won't change if we decide to home school him. He can get those services through the school system but if we chose to do that Derrick and I wouldn't be involved very much. I like being able to pick the therapist who "get him" and have more knowledge of what's going on in his sessions. No, I'm totally not a control freak at all lol

 
SchoolBusMom 
SJ Divalicious
Posts: 11781
SchoolBusMom
Reg: 08-23-07

02-23-13 12:03 PM - Post#4048934    
    In response to Nora

Our county has a fabulous program. I drive the special needs bus. I hear a lot of great things. The program is housed at different schools in the county. The child is bussed to the school that fits their needs.

The high schoolers do a lot of what they call "community days". They take them grocery shopping, they work at Goodwill, golf courses, and restaurants. They are taught how to ride public transportation. While in class they cook once a week and they are taught how to do laundry and how to keep house. Of course, they also do math, reading, gym, etc...



 
kaleidoscope 
SJ Queen of the Crop
Posts: 27368
kaleidoscope
Reg: 02-13-09

02-23-13 01:00 PM - Post#4048974    
    In response to Kimberly M

  • Kimberly M Said:
I like being able to pick the therapist who "get him" and have more knowledge of what's going on in his sessions. No, I'm totally not a control freak at all lol



I don't think that's being a control freak at all. It's getting the best fit - not the one size fits all you're going to get in the school. Who may or may not write/follow an IEP as they should.

 
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